first_imgBorussia Dortmund fired Thomas Tuchel as coach on Tuesday, three days after he led the club to its first title in five years.The club issued a statement to say the 43-year-old Tuchel was leaving with immediate effect, one year before his contract was due to expire in 2018.”This is the result of a discussion between Hans-Joachim Watzke (chief executive), Michael Zorc (sports director), Thomas Tuchel and his adviser Olaf Meinking, which took place on Tuesday,” Dortmund said.Dortmund thanked Tuchel and his coaching staff for their sporting success.Tuchel’s last game in charge was the 2-1 win over Eintracht Frankfurt in the German Cup final on Saturday.Tuchel fell out with club officials over the course of an inconsistent season.”Dortmund as an employer will not comment in detail on the reasons for the separation, the result of a long process and supported by all the club boards,” the statement said.”Dortmund attaches great importance to the fact that the cause of the separation is by no means (just) a disagreement between two people. The wellbeing of the club Borussia Dortmund, which constitutes much more than just the sporting success, will always be more important than individuals and possible differences between them.”Tuchel, a former Mainz coach who followed in Juergen Klopp’s footsteps by taking over in Dortmund in 2015, led the side to second place in the Bundesliga in his first season, when Dortmund was the best runner-up in the league’s history, and the German Cup final, where again it lost out to league winner Bayern Munich.advertisementTuchel initially earned praise for getting Dortmund out of the slump of Klopp’s final season and for re-introducing an attractive style of attacking play.This season, after a host of summer changes, Tuchel led Dortmund to third place in the Bundesliga behind promoted Leipzig, while finally winning the German Cup at the fourth attempt.Tuchel’s and Dortmund’s difficulties began long before, however, starting in January 2016 when he had a row with chief scout Sven Mislintat, a friend of Zorc’s, over the signing of Spanish midfielder Oliver Torres from Atletico Madrid.After the 2016 German Cup final defeat to Bayern on penalties, he criticized the Bayern-bound Mats Hummels, and he was unhappy with Watzke when other key players like Henrikh Mkhitaryan and Ilkay Gundogan also departed that summer. Tuchels said the squad break-up was “risky,” Watzke said it was “ambitious.”Last January, Tuchel claimed he was unaware of Swedish forward Alexander Isak’s signing, and he questioned his side’s mentality and whether its targets for the season were overambitious the following month after a league defeat to bottom side Darmstadt.The differences really spilled into the open after the bomb attack on the team bus in April, when Tuchel and Watzke clashed over the rescheduling of the affected Champions League game.After the German Cup win on Saturday, Tuchel said he wished to fulfill his contract despite the difficulties.”It seems to me as though the outcome to the talks is open,” he said.Dortmund evidently felt a different way.last_img read more

first_img Associated Press LondonJuly 10, 2019UPDATED: July 10, 2019 21:36 IST Novak Djokovic defeated David Goffin to reach Wimbledon men’s singles semi-finals. (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSNovak Djokovic defeated David Goffin 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 to reach his 9th semi-final of WimbledonNo. 1-seeded Djokovic will face No. 23 Roberto Bautista Agut on FridayBautista Agut reached his first Grand Slam semifinalNovak Djokovic took what was shaping up as an entertaining, well-played matchup in the Wimbledon quarterfinals and quickly turned it into a lopsided romp with a 10-game run.Down an early break, the defending champion grabbed control midway through the opening set Wednesday and never let go, overwhelming the 21st-seeded David Goffin 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 to reach his ninth semifinal at the All England Club.”Obviously things could have gone a different way,” Djokovic said. “Who knows what the match would look like if I lost the first set?”The No. 1-seeded Djokovic will face No. 23 Roberto Bautista Agut on Friday in the semifinals. The Spaniard beat No. 26 Guido Pella of Argentina 7-5, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3.Djokovic is seeking his fifth Wimbledon championship and 17th Grand Slam trophy overall.Roberto Bautista Agut reached his first Grand Slam semifinal by beating Guido Pella 7-5, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 at Wimbledon.The Spaniard broke Pella in the opening game of the first two sets, and then again for a 2-1 lead in the fourth. He served out the victory on his first match point when Pella sent a forehand long.The 31-year-old Bautista Agut, who had never been past the fourth round of a Grand Slam before, will play defending champion Novak Djokovic on Friday.Bautista Agut was the only player to reach the quarterfinals without dropping a set, while Pella had spent nearly twice as much time on court 12 hours, 47 minutes compared to 6 hours, 48 minutes after coming through two five-setters.Also Read | 15-year-old Coco Gauff thinking about Wimbledon next yearadvertisementAlso Read | Wimbledon 2019: Serena Williams battles to reach semis, Simona Halep eases throughAlso SeeFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnita Jat Tags :Follow Wimbledon 2019Follow Novak Djokovic Next Wimbledon 2019: Roberto Bautista Agut sets semi-final date with Novak DjokovicTop seeded Novak Djokovic and 23rd seed Roberto Bautista Agut will be up against each other in the Wimbledon men’s singles semi-final.advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgF1 legend Michael Schumacher admitted to Paris hospital for ‘secret treatment’Former F1 world champion Michael Schumacher has not been seen in public since a skiing accident five years ago that left him with severe head injuries and in a medically-induced coma for several months.advertisement Next Reuters ParisSeptember 10, 2019UPDATED: September 10, 2019 12:58 IST Michael Schumacher remains motor racing’s most successful driver. (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTSF1 great Michael Schumacher has been admitted to a Paris hospital for treatementAs per a French newspaper, he would undergo treatment based on stem-cell transfusionSchumacher remains motor racing’s most successful driver, with a record 91 grand prix winsFormer Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher was admitted to a Paris hospital for “secret treatment” earlier on Monday, Le Parisien newspaper reported.Schumacher turned 50 on Jan. 3 but has not been seen in public since a skiing accident in the French Alps five years ago that left him with severe head injuries and in a medically-induced coma for several months.Schumacher was taken to the Pompidou hospital in southwest Paris on Monday afternoon, Le Parisien said, without citing its sources.The French newspaper said the former champion would undergo treatment based on stem-cell transfusion by French surgeon Philippe Menasche.A spokeswoman for Schumacher did not immediately return a request for comment.Schumacher remains motor racing’s most successful driver, with a record 91 grand prix wins. He won his first two titles with Benetton in 1994 and 1995 before five in a row with Ferrari between 2000-2004.In January his family released a statement saying he was in “the very best of hands”.Also Read | F1: Charles Leclerc ends Ferrari’s 9-year wait for Italian GP winAlso Read | Italian GP: Charles Leclerc puts Ferrari on pole at Monza amid last lap farceAlso SeeFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAnita Jat Tags :Follow Formula OneFollow Michael Schumacherlast_img read more

first_imgzoomIllustration; Source: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Miami-based cruise major Royal Caribbean Cruises closed the quarter ended June 30, 2019, with record second-quarter earnings.US GAAP net income for the quarter was USD 472.8 million, compared to USD 466.3 million posted in Q2 2018.In addition, adjusted net income stood at USD 532.7 million in the second quarter of 2019, against USD 482.2 million seen in the corresponding three-month period a year earlier.As explained, the improvement over last year was mainly driven by increased revenue from Royal Caribbean’s global brands. “We are elated to see our brands executing so effectively, keeping our business in an exceptionally strong position,” Richard D. Fain, chairman and CEO, pointed out.The overall positive results were achieved despite the United States’ decision to ban cruise ships from docking in Cuba, preventing group tours and cruise ship stops to the island nation.“Better demand for onboard experiences as well as strong close-in demand for our core products fully offset the impact from the travel restrictions to Cuba which equated to 30 basis points for the quarter,” according to the company.Due to an increase in costs related to the travel restrictions to Cuba, current fuel pricing, as well as other factors, Royal Caribbean estimates 2019 adjusted EPS to be in the range of USD 9.55 to USD 9.65 per share.“The company’s booked position for the remainder of 2019 continues to set new records with all core products in line or ahead of the company’s previous expectations,” Jason T. Liberty, executive vice president and CFO, commented. “While it is too early to provide detailed color on 2020, we are delighted that bookings are already off to a very strong start.”Royal Caribbean Cruises controls and operates four brands including Royal Caribbean International, Celebrity Cruises, Azamara and Silversea Cruises. It is also a 50% joint venture owner of the German brand TUI Cruises and a 49% shareholder in the Spanish brand Pullmantur Cruceros. Together, these brands operate a combined total of 63 ships with an additional 13 on order as of June 30, 2019.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: In order to enhance safety and security of passengers, the Delhi Railway Police (GRP) has deployed 10 numbers of upgraded motorcycles to intensify patrolling in and around the railway stations. The newly-deployed motorcycles have been upgraded with revolving flashers, blinkers, public announcement system, sirens, flashlight, two helmets and cruiser side box, Deputy Commissioner of Police (GRP) Dinesh Kumar Gupta said. “These motor cycles have been provided to give speed to policing at Railway Stations. The policing on Motor Cycle at Railway Station will also reduce the reaction time and also certainly give an impression of security to general public,” said DCP Gupta.last_img

first_imgLauderhill: Krunal Pandya’s two last-over sixes after Rohit Sharma’s characteristically sublime 67 lifted India to 167 for five against West Indies in the second T20 International here on Sunday. Rohit scored his runs off 51 balls, setting India up for a challenging total before Pandya and Ravindra Jadeja propped up the innings by smashing 20 runs in the final over, which was bowled by Keemo Paul. In the process, Rohit became T20 internationals’ most prolific six-hitter, going past Chris Gayle with 106 maximums. He struck six fours and three sixes in the match. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhSent into bat, India were off to a quick start as they reached 50-run mark in the seventh over, with Rohit doing the bulk of scoring. Rohit found the gaps with ease, clipping Paul off his pads for a six over deep midwicket. The World Cup highest scorer then swept him for a four as the Indians upped the tempo. Keemo Paul gave West Indies their first breakthrough when he bowled Shikhar Dhawan with the Indian scorecard reading 67 for one in the eighth over. Two quite overs followed as Indian captain Virat Kohli joined Rohit, who broke the shackles with a six over deep midwicket, Sunil Narine being the bowler, and then brought up his 17th half-century in this format with a single to long-off. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterNicely getting underneath the flight of left-arm spinner Khary Pierre, Kohli got going with a neat six. Well settled at the other end, Kohli’s deputy Rohit then smashed Carlos Brathwaite for a six and four as India’s hundred came up in the 13th over. It took a fine catch from Shimron Hetmyer to bring an end to Rohit’s stay in the middle — he hit one high up in the air off Oshane Thomas with just over six overs left in the Indian innings. Rishabh Pant (5) perished quickly, top-edging Oshane into the hands of third man fielder Kieron Pollard. Sheldon Cottrell then had the big one, sending Kohli’s middle stump cartwheeling for a 23-ball 28 with a perfectly-executed yorker and performing his trademark salute celebrations. By that time tough, Kohli became the highest run scorer among Indians in T20 cricket, including domestic tourneys.last_img read more

first_imgFrom a young age, outside voices such as school dress codes and harsh comments from peer groups influence how girls feel about their appearance.Shonda Rhimes participated in a panel with powerful young womenWhile girls today are strong and resilient, these comments still have a negative impact on her self-esteem and make her less likely to participate in things like trying out for sports or raising her hand in class. It’s time for her to hear something different. Dove and Shonda Rhimes have teamed up to launch the Girl Collective, a multigenerational sisterhood created to build confidence and challenge beauty stereotypes through honest, authentic and practical conversations shared between women and girls. The Girl Collective is powered by the Dove Self Esteem Project which has been hosting self-esteem workshops in schools and providing at-home self-esteem materials and exercises since 2004. Now, with the Girl Collective, these self-esteem experiences from Dove can continue to spread and support girls and women everywhere.Inaugural members of the group include Shonda Rhimes, Musician SZA, Transgender Activist Jazz Jennings, intimate apparel brand Aerie, Viral Dance Group Syncopated Ladies, and many more powerful and inspiring voices.“Six in 10 girls believe that to do well in life they have to look a certain way and that just shouldn’t be,” says Shonda Rhimes who has been working with Dove for two years as Chief Storyteller in an effort to ensure every woman and girl sees herself represented in media and culture. “Last year I participated in my first-ever Dove Self-Esteem Workshop and I was inspired by the power of women and girls connecting to tackle issues that impact so many of us. I’m proud to be a part of this remarkable community which illustrates the magic we can unlock when we work together to inspire change and build confidence.”Dove marked the launch of Girl Collective with an electrifying super-event in Los Angeles on Saturday, October 6 – the largest convening of its kind in the brand’s history. Hundreds of women and girls attended a series of powerful social conversations inspiring everyone to take action to raise self-esteem, all powered by Dove Self-Esteem Project accredited curriculum. More Like Me: Chief Storyteller Shonda Rhimes participated in a stimulating panel with powerful young women about expanding representation. Shonda urged women and girls to remember they are the main character of their own story, encouraging them to claim their power and begin defining beauty for themselves. Skin Deep: Musician SZA and Dove Self-Esteem Educator Dre Brown explored the relationship our culture and ethnicity play in defining our beauty identities. SZA encouraged girls to create their own beauty standards rather than subscribe to someone else’s. Girl Redefined: Transgender Activist Jazz Jennings joined Sexuality & Relationship expert Dr. Logan Levkoff to challenge ideas of gender, beauty and femininity to create new appreciation for and acceptance of beauty that is fluid. Through examples of her own journey, Jazz’s helped the collective understand that they have the power to create their own reality. From “the Gram” to the Ground: With a shared mission of helping girls develop a positive relationship with the way they look, Aerie teamed up with Dove to join Girl Collective along with #AerieReal ambassador and former Fashion Editor Lauren Chan and provide actionable ways girls can be body positive champions in their schools and communities.Check out more inspiring highlights, including the full panel discussion, from the Dove Girl Collective event here.last_img read more

first_imgAt the end of March there were 664 properties of all types available for purchase through the Multiple Listing Service® in the Fort St. John region, down from 695 at this time a year ago. The Board said that employment opportunities from the increase in oil and gas activity and with the Site ‘C’ Dam has not translated into increased market activity. However, BCNREB President Court Smith stated that Fort St. John is not the only market in Northeast B.C. with a trend of lower inventory. “Many areas have been impacted by the prolonged winter weather. Most markets are seeing reduced sales activity and lower inventory over the same period last year,” said Smith.Smith added that overall, Northern B.C. continues to be a very affordable market compared to the rest of the province. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The B.C. Northern Real Estate Board released its sales results from the first quarter of 2018 which shows that while there were more home sales compared to the same time last year, that hasn’t translated to increased prices.The Board’s statistics show that 95 properties worth $31.1 million were sold during the first three months of the year. Of those homes sold, 55 were single-family dwellings, which is an increase over the 41 single family homes sold in the first quarter of 2017. However, the value of home sales in the first quarter of last year was $38.6 million. Single family homes continue to see a drop in value. The average price of a detached home last year during the first quarter was $410,623. This year, the average price was $340,968, nearly $70,000 lower.  last_img read more

OXFORD, Ohio — Jalen Adaway scored 18 points and Nike Sibande added another 16 off the bench as Miami (Ohio) cruised past NAIA member Wilberforce, 88-57 on Saturday afternoon.Miami roared to a 41-23 lead at intermission, shooting 35 of 69 from the field (50.7 per cent) and knocking down 10 of 26 from beyond the 3-point arc.Darrian Ringo dished out 12 assists and collected six steals and the Redhawks forced 22 turnovers by the Bulldogs. Aleks Abrams pulled down 14 rebounds while Miami staked a 48-30 advantage on the boards. Dalonte Brown contributed 14 points.Tyler Wilson-Hopkins scored 13 points for Wilberforce.The Redhawks (4-4) travel to face preseason Horizon League favourite Wright State Wednesday.Wilberforce, which plays as an independent, has now lost eight in a row, all but one on the road.The Associated Press read more

Bristol University has become embroiled in a row with Jewish students after rejecting their complaint about a lecturer who taught that parts of the Zionist lobby is funding Islamophobia. The lecture, which he gave earlier this year as part of a series titled “Harms of the Powerful”, left Jewish students in his class feeling “uncomfortable and intimidated”, according to one complaint submitted to Bristol’s vice-Chancellor.   A slide show… The university is accused of failing to take Jewish students’ complaints seriously after it dismissed their concerns about David Miller, a sociology professor, who told undergraduates that “ultra Zionist funders are active” in bankrolling hatred of Muslims.  

first_imgResearchers at the Carnegie Institute for Science (CIS) are celebrating the discovery of a planet that is in prime position to have liquid water on its surface, and even possibly life. The possibility comes from the fact that the planet sits right in the middle of the habitable zone in relation to its star. Up until now, all the other planets that have been discovered have either been too close or too far from the star they orbit, making them rather inhospitable places to be. Not so with the planet named GJ 667Cc.The CIS scientists are calling the planet the “Holy Grail” in the search for planets that could support life. Along with its ideal distance from its star, GJ 667Cc takes 28 days to make its orbit. What’s interesting to note is that GJ 667Cc resides in a triple-star system, with two of the stars being distant enough to not affect its climate but still be visible in the sky.Unfortunately, unless faster-than-light neutrinos become a reality, you and I will not live to see the surface of GJ 667Cc because it sits 22 light-years away from Earth. It resides in the Scorpius constellation, and is relatively close when it comes to the proximity of other heavenly bodies, but a huge distance given the state of our current technology.The scientific team at CIS is hoping that its study is also an indication that there are a large amount of these kinds of planets in the galaxy. It feels that because GJ 667Cc was found so fast and easily that the odds would indicate that this could be the case. Of course, it could have just been a case of enormous luck!via at Scientific AmericanEdit: Fixed the wording. Thanks for all the comments pointing on the slip-up.last_img read more

first_imgLondon attacker: A 52-year-old violent criminal with a number of aliases The attacker had never been convicted of terrorism officers was not the subject of investigations. Image: DPA/PA Images By AFP Image: DPA/PA Images 14,994 Views Short URL Mar 24th 2017, 7:45 AM Friday 24 Mar 2017, 7:45 AM 41 Comments THE MAN WHO mowed down pedestrians and stabbed a policeman in Wednesday’s deadly assault outside Britain’s parliament has been identified by police as 52-year-old former convict Khalid Masood.Known by “a number of aliases”, London’s Metropolitan Police said he had been convicted for a string of offences but none of them terror-related.Born on Christmas Day 1964 in Kent in southeast England, Masood had been living in the West Midlands where armed police have staged several raids since the attack, storming properties in the city of Birmingham.The police confirmed he was a British citizen.Police said today that the birth name of Khalid Masood is Adrian Russell Ajao.He was brought up by a single parent in the town of Rye, on the southern English coast, according to The Times.Over the course of two decades, Masood chalked up a range of convictions for assault, grievous bodily harm, possession of offensive weapons and public order offences, police said, with the incidents taking place between 1983 and 2003.Prime Minister Theresa May said he was once investigated by the intelligence service MI5 “in relation to concerns about violent extremism”. security cordon is seen on embankment outside the Houses of Parliament in London on Wednesday. Source: SIPA USA/PA ImagesBut Masood had never been convicted of terrorism offences and “was not the subject of any investigations,” the police said, noting there was “no prior intelligence about his intent to mount a terrorist attack”.At 52, his age has been highlighted by commentators as unusual, with most Islamist extremists behind similar attacks far younger.Although the police believe Masood acted alone, the Islamic State group claimed he was one of its “soldiers” acting on a call to target countries fighting the jihadists in Iraq and Syria.‘A nice guy’Masood rented the car used in the attack from the Solihull branch of Enterprise, on the outskirts of Birmingham, the company confirmed in a statement.According to the BBC, he told the car rental company that he was a teacher.A spokeswoman for Britain’s education ministry told AFP Masood was not a qualified teacher and had therefore not taught in any state schools. The London attacker pictures after being shot on Wednesday. Source: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire.The Sun newspaper said Masood stayed in a hotel on the outskirts of Brighton, a seaside city south of London, on the night before the attack.London’s Metropolitan Police would not confirm the newspaper’s report that investigators went to the hotel following the attack after finding a receipt in the hire car.British media described Masood as a Muslim convert, with one source telling Sky News he was a “very religious, well spoken man”.“You couldn’t go to his home in Birmingham on Friday because he would be at prayer,” said the source, who Sky said met Masood in a professional capacity.“He was a nice guy. I used to see him outside doing his garden,” Iwona Romek, a former neighbour of his told the Birmingham Mail.“He had a wife, a young Asian woman and a small child who went to school,” she said. Other media have reported that he was a married father-of-three.Romek said the family had abruptly moved out of their house in Winson Green, a neighbourhood in western Birmingham, around Christmas without saying goodbye.Romek said she could not imagine him carrying out an attack, adding:Now I’m scared that someone like that was living close to me.More recently Masood may have been living in a flat next to a Persian restaurant and a pizza parlour in the upmarket Edgbaston neighbourhood, according to reports.One neighbour at that address told The Telegraph newspaper they were fearful after the day’s events:It’s left me so scared and I don’t know what to tell the children. He seemed like a normal calm and kind family man, always with a smile on his face.Following an armed raid on the property overnight, a man working in a shop nearby told the Press Association simply:The man from London lived here.Read: 75-year-old man becomes fifth person to die after Westminster attackRead: ‘We are not afraid’ – London pays tribute to Westminster victims Share1 Tweet Email http://jrnl.ie/3304039 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

first_img“After 17 years of field investigation in Byblos, which began in the 1960s by Honor Frost, a pioneer in the field of marine archaeology in Lebanon, the basin of the ancient port was finally located at the southern foot of the hill that hosted the ancient city”. Speaking to the daily Greek newspaper Kathimerini, Lebanese archaeologist Dr Martine Francis-Allouche could not have been more excited about the findings, that promise to shed new light to Byblos’ past.One of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, Byblos is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but up until recently, archaeologists had a hard time looking for signs of a Bronze Age port, from which timber exports (the famous Lebanon cedar trees) were shipped to Egypt and other parts of the broader region. Now this is changing, largely due to the Greek scientists assisting Dr. Francis-Allouche and her co-supervisor of the project, French Egyptologist Nicolas Grimal. “From dawn to dusk we are in the sea. We plan the boat routes so as to form a dense canvas of courses to collect as much data as possible,” explains George Papatheodorou, professor of environmental and geological oceanography at the University of Patra’s Department of Geology, which participates to the “Byblos and the sea” project. The university lab has 30 years of experience in the area of maritime geology and oceanography, gaining international recognition after its research in the sea area of Alexandria in Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean. Leading a small and flexible team, Dr. Papatheodorou and alternate professor Maria Geraga (with help from researchers Nikos Georgiou, Dimitris Christodoulou, Xenophon Dimas, Margarita Iatrou and Despina Zoura) are tracing the seabed for submerged formations now covered by sand due to geological or human intervention. By combining traditional archaeology with sciences, the maritime archaeologists will be able to see, as it were, the port of Byblos that reached its peak 6,000 years ago. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

first_imgClark County Public Health discovered Thursday that a company selling septic tank additives is calling local residents, claiming there is an alert about failing septic systems, and offering products to clean the systems.Additives, which are commercial products, are sold with claims that they can improve performance or aesthetics of on-site sewer treatment systems.“However, most additives do not have a positive effect on the operation of on-site systems and may, in fact, contaminate groundwater aquifers,” according to a health department press release.The Washington State Department of Health has a list of approved on-site septic system additives that don’t have adverse effects on water quality or public health.View the list at www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/Pubs/337-025.pdf. According to Public Health, “routine operations and maintenance inspections with certified specialists are the best method for preventing costly septic system failures.”For more information, including a list of certified operation and maintenance specialists, visit the Public Health website: www.clark.wa.gov/public-health/site-septic-systems.last_img read more

first_imgClick to download the full Employee Benefits Salary Survey 2017. EXCLUSIVE: Almost nine in 10 (88%) HR and benefits professional respondents receive life assurance or death-in-service benefits, according to research by Employee Benefits.The Salary survey 2017, which surveyed 249 HR, reward and benefits professionals in December 2016, also found that 75% of respondents’ organisations offer private medical insurance (PMI).These benefits also held the two top spots in the Employee Benefits Salary survey 2014, when 84% of respondents were offered life assurance or death in service, and 59% had access to PMI.Employee assistance programmes (EAPs) and counselling (73%), mobile phones (45%), and income protection or permanent health insurance (45%) complete the top five core benefits received by respondents, outside of pensions, cars and share schemes. These benefits have also experienced an increase in popularity since 2014, when 43% of respondents had access to counselling or an EAP, 32% were provided with a mobile phone, and 28% received income protection or permanent health insurance as an employer-paid benefit.Three-quarters (75%) of respondents work for an organisation that offers a voluntary benefits scheme, and 38% of respondents have access to a flexible benefits programme.The proportion of respondents with access to a voluntary benefits scheme has increased significantly since the Employee Benefits Salary survey in 2008 and 2009, when 46% and 59% of respondents had access to a voluntary benefits scheme, respectively.The number of respondents that are employed by an organisation with a flexible benefits plan has also risen, albeit at a lesser rate; 21% of respondents’ organisations had a flexible benefits plan in place in 2008, compared to 25% in 2009.last_img read more

first_imgDirector Kunal Kohli’s acting debut Phir Se is yet to get its release date as the filmmaker is not getting a suitable week for it. The Hum Tum director, who is making his foray into acting opposite TV star Jennifer Winget, said he is looking for a good date. “#PhirSe release date being worked. Next few months packed, looking for a good date, once locked music will follow accordingly,” Kunal posted on Twitter.Phir Se, co-directed by Kunal and debut filmmaker Ajay Bhuyan, is said to be based on a separated couple living in London and they are trying to come to terms with the consequences of their split. The trailer of the film released on April 7, 2015. Phir Se was earlier scheduled to hit theatres in May. The film faced legal trouble when writer Jyoti Kapoor filed a suit against the director for copyright infringement.last_img read more

first_imgRelated CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floorcenter_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  This is a quick look inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) neuro-interventional suite at Henry Ford Hospital in Detriot, Mich. This neuro-procedure room connects through a door to a traditional operating room and the patient can be transferred using a trolley cot system to move between the two rooms. The MRI is a Philips 1.5T Achieva and the MRI suite includes MRI-safe surgical instruments, furniture and anesthesia system.Find more Henry Ford Hospital related content. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Information Technology View all 220 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:22Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:22 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 21, 2019 VIDEO: MRI Neuro-interventional Suite at Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting.last_img read more

first_imgTags: Argentina, Goway Travel Posted by Argentina to attract foreigners by cutting 21% tax on hotels Travelweek Group The Mauricio Macri government of Argentina has issued a decree that refunds the 21% VAT (value-added tax) for accommodation services for foreign visitors in an attempts to attract more visitors. This is part of an ambitious tourism plan that aims to generate 300,000 jobs and raise international arrivals to 9 million and spending to $8bn USD by 2020. So far this year, tourism arrivals have fallen by 6.3%. According to the new regulation, foreigners will continue to be invoiced the same values that exist today. However, VAT invoiced for hotel services will be returned in a “direct and automatic” way on debit and credit cards issued abroad.Goway says the new VAT exemption for foreigners means big savings on accommodation in Argentina. “Globetrotters who’ve been dragging their tango heels on booking trips to Argentina may want to take the plunge in 2017,” says Goway. “The elimination of the VAT (value added tax) on hotels for foreigners makes this already very affordable destination even more tempting.”More news:  Can you guess the top Instagrammed wedding locations in the world?Goway offers tours such as Goway’s Argentina Top to Bottom, to innovative Argentina vacations such as Crossing Argentina, which mixes in a taste of Lima, Peru, to short city breaks that show off the best of Buenos Aires. Tuesday, February 7, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more